Men of Faith

There is no one without faults, not even men of God. They are men of God not because they are faultless, but because they know their faults, they strive against them, they do not hide them, and are ever ready to correct themselves” – Mahatma Ghandi
 
Over the coming months we want to explore what it means to be Men of God, how that plays out in our lives, what it means for our character and for what we want to become in our future.
 
We want you to come alongside us and learn and discuss and build strong brotherhood. We will be opening up the Bible and discussing its many flawed men and how they lived and died, succeeded and failed, we will be talking about struggles we face; and our hope is that as a group we can grow to be open and honest with one another about the challenges we face, difficulties we have with being Godly outside of the safety of Church and how we can be supportive of one another in a life that is increasingly insular for men.
 
We all have faults as much as we have strengths and one of the biggest problems for men of any age, in any walk of life, is not being able to discuss the problems we meet in our lives.
Now some of you may have very open expressions of emotions and wonder what I am talking about, but I know that some of us have been raised, and still live in an environment, that faces problems with stiff lipped stoicism, even if it kills us!
 
We don’t believe that is what God intended us to be and we see in Jesus the example of a man of deep strength, deep compassion, but also open fears and struggles. He needed and wanted the companionship of his friends, he wanted the support of his ‘brothers’ when things were at their worst, see here, in what’s described as the “agony of the garden” Matt 26:39-40
“Were you not able to stay awake with me for one hour?”
 
and we believe that for us, as men, to truly grow into being the best reflection of God we cannot just hear the words of the songs, or read the occasional bible verse, or even limit our Christianity to daily prayer. We need one another! We need to lift each other up and challenge each other when we make mistakes. Above all, for now though, we need to know that here, amongst brothers, we can be truthful about our mistakes, our doubts, our sins; knowing that we are not going to judge you as we hope you don’t judge us.
 
So as you drink and chat can I challenge you to open up some discussion on a couple of questions:
– What do you think it means to be ‘a man after God’s own heart’?
– Where do you struggle most with your Christian walk?
– Are there any stereotypes or expressions of being a man that you find difficult, incorrect or harmful in our modern world?
 
Ben Gough